Why scan?


Today, more and more companies convert paper archives and document files piling up in offices and storage rooms into digital media. The "paperless office", a convenient and cost effective option, becomes a new standard which is required of any organization that wishes to maintain its image and high level service. Sometimes the very thought of scanning the paperwork archive can be a deterrent, and it may be lowered to the bottom rung of the list of priorities.


So why scan documents?

In order to understand the profitability of scanning, ask yourselves the following questions:

  • How often does the company have to take out documents and use them?
  • Where are the documents kept?
  • what is the cost of the present storage?
  • how long does the company have to store documents?

This article briefly explains the impact of each one of these variables and may assist you in deciding whether it is worthwhile and profitable for you to scan your archive.


Data Retrieval Frequency

his article briefly explains the impact of each one of these variables and may assist you in deciding whether it is worthwhile and profitable for you to scan your archive.

Organizations that have completed the transition to a "paperless office" will attest to how efficient they have become. If the company has a daily need for file and document retrieval, the advantages inherent in the increased level of efficiency and capacity to maintain quicker and more successful customer service, may in itself finance the document scanning.


Cost of present storage

An additional advantage of scanning documents is saving on storage space. Many organizations decide to scan their archive in order to save storage space.

If you store your documents in external storage facilities, the storage cost over the years will certainly exceed their scanning cost. If you store the documents in the office, where payment for each square meter is highest, scanning the documents will certainly be cheaper.

Storage in basements and storage rooms may be inexpensive and worthwhile, particularly when there is no frequent need for the documents. However, will these documents be in the proper condition if you need this data in another 10 years?


Data location vs. data retrieval location

When the organization is located separately from the data location, or when the data is located at a few different sites, locating documents may become a difficult task. Converting the documents into an electronic archive means immediate access to each file, from anywhere (even from home). This means saving time and resources spent on finding lost files or filing all over again.


In case of a disaster

Archive scanning is the best disaster insurance, simply by backing up data and storing it on another site. This may even reduce insurance costs.